GISES Major Overview

About GISES

Sociology with an Intensive Concentration in Global Information and Social Enterprise Studies, known practically as GISES (pronounced, guy-sis), is challenging and designed for highly motivated, self-directed and enterprising students who have demonstrated the capacity to design and complete an honors-quality project for a civil society group.

This site and its associated materials were created to supply prospective and current GISES students with as much context, clarification, and support as possible to help them through the process of deciding if the major or minor is right for them, and then writing the Project Practicum.

Please feel free to email Dr. Chris Benner, cbenner@ucsc.edu, with any questions you may have.

GISES FAQ

What are the GISES major/minor requirements?

Sociology BA with Intensive Concentration in GISES

The following information is from the 2019-20 catalog requirements. For additional information, quarter offerings, worksheet, and sample plans, please visit the sociology department website.

Three Lower-Division Courses Required to Declare the Major and Concentration

The following three courses must be passed with a cumulative GPA of 2.8 or better, and have approval from the program director (which takes place in SOCY 30A) prior to declaring the major.

Select two of the following three courses:

  • SOCY 1 Introduction to Sociology
  • SOCY 10 Issues and Problems in American Society
  • SOCY 15 World Society (CC GE)

AND complete:

  • SOCY 30A Introduction to Global Information and Social Enterprise Studies (PE-T GE) – Fall quarter

After completing SOCY 30A in Fall quarter, students must continue on to the upper-division GISES core course requirements: SOCY 107A in Winter and SOCY 107B in Spring.

Two Lower-Division Core Courses

  • SOCY 3A The Evaluation of Evidence
  • SOCY 3B Statistical Methods (SR GE)

Two Upper-Division GISES Core Courses

  • SOCY 107A Designing ICT Projects for Social Enterprise (formerly SOCY 30B)- Winter quarter
  • SOCY 107B Project Implementation and Grant Writing (formerly SOCY 30C) – 3 unit course, Spring quarter

Two Upper-Division Core Courses

  • SOCY 105A – Classical Social Theory
  • SOCY 105B – Contemporary Social Theory

Five Upper-Division Elective Courses

  • Electives must either be from the Sociology Department at UCSC, numbered SOCY 110-189, or from the list of approved electives for GISES.
  • 5-unit Independent Studies taken with the Program Director, Professor Chris Benner, are approved to count as upper division electives.
  • All other upper division electives must be petitioned with the Program Director, Professor Chris Benner. Electives must be upper division and 5 units at UCSC (abroad courses may carry different units). If you are petitioning a new course for approval, please complete this online form. 

Please notes: students who are following the previous catalog requirements, 2018-19 or prior, were required to justify their upper-division, 5 unit electives explaining how each elective contributes to your project and/or your growth as a technology activist and/or technology linked social change advocate after graduation. Please refer to the Elective Justification section below.

One Project Practicum

  • SOCY 196G – Offered Fall quarter. Prerequisite: SOCY 107B. Please review the project information further below.

One Comprehensive Requirement

  1. Complete the Sociology Capstone Course. SOCY 196A, Capstone: The Sociologist as a Public Intellectual. 5-unit course offered Spring quarter only.
  2. Complete a Senior Thesis. Students must enroll in 10-15 units (SOCY 195A and B mandatory, 195C is optional) of independent study thesis coursework. Prerequisite: SOCY 3A and faculty approval, DC requirement completion recommended.

For additional information visit the sociology website.

 

GISES Minor

The following information is from the 2019-20 catalog requirements. For additional information, quarter offerings, and worksheet please visit the sociology department website.

One Lower-Division Course to Qualify for Declaration

The following course must be passed with a C or better and students must have approval from the program director (which takes place in SOCY 30A) prior to declaring the minor. Students must be declared in a major first prior to declaring a minor.

  • SOCY 30A Introduction to Global Information and Social Enterprise Studies (PE-T GE) – Fall quarter

Two Upper-Division GISES Core Courses

  • SOCY 107A Designing ICT Projects for Social Enterprise (formerly SOCY 30B)- Winter quarter
  • SOCY 107B Project Implementation and Grant Writing (formerly SOCY 30C) – 3 unit course, Spring quarter

Three Upper-Division Elective Courses

  • Electives must either be from the Sociology Department at UCSC, numbered SOCY 110-189, or from the list of approved electives for GISES.
  • 5-unit Independent Studies taken with the Program Director, Professor Chris Benner, are approved to count as upper division electives.
  • All other upper division electives must be petitioned with the Program Director, Professor Chris Benner. Electives must be upper division and 5 units at UCSC (abroad courses may carry different units). If you are petitioning a new course for approval, please complete this online form. 

Please notes: students who are following the previous catalog requirements, 2018-19 or prior, were required to justify their upper-division, 5 unit electives explaining how each elective contributes to your project and/or your growth as a technology activist and/or technology linked social change advocate after graduation. Please refer to the Elective Justification section below.

In addition, students who completed the previous versions of SOCY 107A and SOCY 107B (SOCY 30B and SOCY 30C) are required to complete four upper-division electives instead of three, due to the university policy that all minors are required to have a minimum of 25 upper-division units.

One Project Practicum

  • SOCY 196G – Offered Fall quarter. Prerequisite: SOCY 107B. Please review the project information further below.

When should I declare the major/minor?

  • Declaration must happen after you have completed the lower-division qualifying courses detailed above. For the major this is passing SOCY 30A and two of the sociology courses (SOCY 1, SOCY 10, and SOCY 15) with a cumulative GPA of 2.8 or better. For the minor students must pass SOCY 30A with a C or better.
  • Do not declare until you have your GISES proposal approved by the Everett Staff and Executive Director.
  • Students should declare the GISES major/minor if and only if they have a viable project on the way to being implemented, not before.
  • Declaring the major/minor is done with the sociology department, see website for process.

I’ve already done my project and I believe it satisfies the GISES requirements. Can I still declare GISES?

Yes

What is SOCY 196G?

Offered in Fall quarter, students are expected to write and submit your Project Practicum in this course. The prerequisite to this course is SOCY 107B.

What is a GISES Proposal?

A GISES Proposal is a well researched, edited, and polished project proposal that follows the guidelines laid out in the 30A/107A/107B series. It outlines the established needproblem backgroundimplementation methodology, and evaluative measures. It also includes a statement of commitment from a partner organization and clearly defines the ICT value addition that the project is making.

What is a partner organization?

A partner organization is a nonprofit, NGO, school, or civil society group that you have communicated with who is willing to allow you access to their org and/or constituents in order to implement a project. Your project must be clear to them and they must express support for its implementation.

What is an ICT Value Addition?

GISES projects must organically integrate an information and communication technology element to its social justice/sustainability mission. ICT components must not be “tacked on” but should be intrinsic to the project itself and address a specific social/organizational need.

Specific technology will vary but must reflect a level of sophistication on par with what is taught in the Everett tech labs above the level of Tech Essentials. Note that this does not mean that GISES projects must incorporate any specific technology learned in Everett tech labs.

Some examples of a real ICT Value Addition
  • A new website for the organization that assists them in their mission
  • A polished, well produced promotional video to be used in a larger awareness or fundraising campaign, complete with a well developed strategic plan for how the video will be used
  • Construction of an app of some demonstrable use to the org
  • Implementation of a comprehensive constituent relations model (CRM) that will demonstrably improve operation of an org
  • A comprehensive “tech plumbing” project that introduces a myriad of needed technological fixes and improvements
  • A sophisticated social media overhaul and strategic plan complete with trainings and documentation for all stakeholders in said campaign

What is the Project Practicum?

The Project Practicum is an “honors quality” analysis of your completed project. It must demonstrate your project’s unambiguous contribution to advancing a solution to a problem associated with global social justice and/or sustainable development as well as clearly detailing the specific ICT value addition.

Ideally, a future Everett student could examine your Project Practicum and be able to replicate a similar project.

What should be in the Project Practicum?

The practicum must contain a brief natural history of the problem, followed by a coherent project narrative which details the implementation of the project and thorough analysis and evaluation of its results. Include any unexpected developments, challenges, or ways that the project changed due to circumstance during its implementation.

This site contains a full guide on how to write and submit the Project Practicum. Please refer to the Practicum Section.

What does “Honors Quality” mean?

Honors work is that which goes above and beyond the expected standard for an undergraduate student. It is free of padding and reflects a high level of polish. It is something you would be proud to submit as a writing sample to grad school.

Project Practicum

This section is designed to help you navigate the process of preparing to write your GISES project practicum. It is imperative that you read this guide in its entirety before you begin writing. You should read this before even implementing your project.

Download Requirements

A print copy of the Project Practicum Guidelines may be downloaded here.

Orientation

Below is the orientation presentation given to the 2015-2016 cohort. Information is subject to change.

Part I – Front Matter

The first part of your final report will consist of basic information so that a reader will immediately be able to ascertain contact info.

This section is very matter of fact and does not require long paragraphs. Simple bullet points will suffice.

Cover Sheet

The first page of your report should be a cover. At the bare minimum include a centered, large type project title with your name at the bottom. If you want to make a really nice cover, please feel free to! It should at least include:

  • Project title
  • Your name
  • Quarter and year of submission

Personal Information Page

After the cover, include a page containing the various collections of contact info related to the project

  • Your Personal Information
    • Name
    • College Affiliation
    • Graduation Date
    • Permanent Email
    • Phone Number
  • Partner Information
    • Org Name
    • General Email
    • Website
    • Phone Number
    • Supervisor or Main Contacts
      • Names
      • Emails
      • Phone Numbers

Project Vitals

The Project Vitals Page is used to give readers a very quick run down of the project’s basic facts. Please include the following:

  • Name of Project
  • Short Description
  • Location
  • Date Range
  • Funding Received
  • Project’s Core Technology
  • Themes
  • Number of People Directly Served
  • Racial/Ethnic Composition of People Served Directly
  • Number of People Served Indirectly
  • Racial/Ethnic Composition of People Served Indirectly

Short Description

Summarize your project in 100 words or less. If you can fit it in a tweet, even better!

Funding Received

Indicate any awards, scholarships, or grants (including the Everett Grant) you were awarded to fund your project. Please indicate the amount and awarding body. Include any related documents in a folder inside your documents folder.

Themes

Pick one or two themes that you feel best capture your project. Here are a few possible themes to choose from. Feel free to make your own.

  • Tech Literacy
  • Sustainability
  • Capacity Building
  • Labor Rights
  • Agroecology
  • Homeless Rights
  • Reproductive Health
  • Women’s Empowerment
  • Youth Empowerment
  • Adult Tech Literacy
  • LGBT Rights
  • Politics and Advocacy

People Served Directly

How many people were immediately benefited by this project?

Example One

You led a series of computer literacy workshops while training staff to also do these workshops. The people served directly would be the participants of the workshop and the staff you trained.

Example Two

You worked to establish a system of recording data on coffee farmers. The people served directly would be the staff of the organization who will be using these techniques and technologies

People Served Indirectly

This is a bit fuzzier so don’t worry about getting an exact number. Please do include the rationale for how you arrived at this number. It’s best to discuss this with your partner so that you can both think about the impact of the project.

Example One

In the previous computer literacy workshop example, the indirect impact would be the expected number of people over the next year who will take the workshop after you leave.

Example Two

In the previous coffee reporting example, the indirect impact would be the approximate number of people that the staff will eventually interview using this new method.

Publication Copy

We have a lot of things that we want to do with these practicums in terms of teaching and promoting the program and your project. It’s really time consuming for us write new stuff whenever we want to mention it in a syllabus or assignment, or share it online, or whatever. That’s why we’re shifting that to you!

“Copy” means “matter to be printed”. Words on a newspaper, magazine, website, etc. are examples of copy. We want you to write copy regarding your project that is tailored for a particular purpose. This means different lengths and different tones depending on the platform and the audience.

Formats

Twitter

Chris tells his doctoral students that their dissertation isn’t done until they can tweet it. In other words, take the big sprawling, deeply personal thing you did and just wrote page after page about and summarize it in 140 characters or less.

Facebook

Facebook allows you more space than Twitter. The main audience for our Facebook is other students. . Generally, don’t just state facts, hook the audience!

Instagram

We’ll share your pictures on Instagram, but we need a caption to go with it. Write 140 characters or less to accompany each image you submit.

Haiku

Ok this one is just for fun, but you should totally do it. A haiku is a style of Japanese poetry that utilizes a three line structure in which the first line has five syllables, the second has seven, and the third has five. An example:

We empower youth
No more complaints just action
Projects change the world

Part II – Project Story

The report proper takes the form of a narrative. This is less formal than a typical college essay because a project is a very personal endeavor. You poured so much of yourself into this and we don’t want to have a sanitized, cold recitation of facts concerning what happened. Let your voice show through. Put us there on site with you. This doesn’t mean you can be sloppy of course. This is for your graduation requirement so it should be proofread and edited for errors and readability.

The narrative should take us through the whole story of how your project happened. How did you decide what to do? How did you make contact with your partner? Did things change from what you expected to what you designed? Did the project change when you got there? What has happened with the project since it wrapped? Someone reading this should be able to get a clear picture of everything that went into this project and, along with supporting documents, could ideally recreate your project elsewhere.

Using This Framework

Below we have a rough framework for how you can put your narrative together. We’ve included what we feel are the important aspects of your project that we’d like you to touch on. Although the headings and bullet points suggest a rigid structure, we hope that you don’t allow it to tie your hands. There are volumes to speak about your projects, so do not limit yourself to the headings and prompts listed here.

Section One – Research and Preparation

Defining Your Issue

  • What was the need and social problem you worked on?
  • Why do you think this particular social problem is important?
  • How did you go about researching your issue?

Developing Your Partnership

  • How did you identify your organizational partner?
  • Why did you choose this organization?
  • How did you build a relationship with them?
  • How did you go about assessing them?
  • How did you establish their technical needs?

Planning Your Project

  • What were your most important goals for the project and how did you develop these goals?
  • What did you do to learn the technology you were going to use?
  • How did you research possible funding opportunities?
  • How did you prepare in advance for your fieldwork?

Section Two – Implementation and Evaluation

Implementing Your Project

  • What did you actually do and accomplish in your project?
  • How was your implementation different from your plan, and why?
  • How did your goals for the project change and why?

Evaluating Your Project

  • What impact did your project have on the intended beneficiaries and how do you know this?
  • What lasting impact did your project have on your partner organization and how do you know?
  • What did you expect to achieve from your project and what did you actually achieve?
  • Are you satisfied with how the tech component turned out?
  • With the benefit of hindsight, do you still believe the ICT you used was the right pick?

Lessons for Successful Project Implementation

  • What personal capacities were valuable for you in implementing your project and why?
  • What apects of the class and labs were valuable in implementing your project?
  • What support systems were valuable for you in implementing your project and why?

Lessons for Social Innovation

  • What lessons did you learn from your project about effective ways of addressing the social problem you were focused on?
  • What lessons did you learn about the role of digital tools in addressing your social problem?
  • How would you describe the most significant social innovation lesson that you learned from this work?

Part III – Appendices

There is a lot that goes into your project that doesn’t necessarily fit into a narrative format, but we nonetheless want you to include.

Appendix A – Original Proposal

Please include a copy of the most recent project proposal related to this project. Usually, the one you submitted to the Everett RFP or at the end of the 30 series.

Appendix B, C, D… – Other Matter

Anything else having to do with the project, please include as an appendix. Some examples include:

  • Training materials
  • Written lessons
  • Flyers/Posters/Promotional Materials
  • Particularly important emails
  • Important documents

What to Submit

Your final submission will be a collection of files, all properly titled, and compressed into a zip file. Once you’ve created your zip file, email it to Chris Benner at cbenner@ucsc.edu Use this as a checklist. Your submission folder should consist of the following:

  • Two versions of your practicum
    • Version One: Includes your appendices
    • Version Two: Does not include appendices
    • Note: We ask for two versions because it’s easier for sharing purposes
  • Standalone file versions of your appendices
    • Please put all appendices into a sub folder titled “Appendices”
    • If you are including any graphic design artifacts, please include the raw design files (.ai, .psd, etc.) as well as exported products (.png, .jpg, .pdf, etc.)
  • Grant documentation if applicable
  • Field notes/reports if applicable
  • Photos
    • Please put all photos into a sub folder

Regarding Photos

Please submit 10 of your best photos. Make sure you have at least 2-3 good photos of your site/project; at least 2-3 photo should include you doing your work and all should be at the highest resolution possible.

Taking Good Photos

Please keep this in mind as one of the things you need to do while your project is happening. Give someone else the camera or just ask them to remember to take a picture. We need at least one good shot where no one is looking at the camera. A line of people pretending to smile while looking directly forward does not make a compelling photo, so please make a good shot happen.

Regarding File Names

Please title your files and folders appropriately. This includes descriptive names like, Appendix A: Proposal.pdf and Project Practicum - Full.pdf. Note that it’s totally OK to use spaces in file and folder names.

Elective Justification

This section does NOT apply to students who are following the 2019-20 (or after) catalog requirements. Justifying electives only applies to students who declared the major prior to the 2019-20 academic year.

The GISES concentration and minor differs from the normal Sociology major in the upper division elective requirements. Vanilla Sociology requires you to take a certain amount of electives within the Soc department and allows for a limited number of course substitutions. The GISES concentration/minor allows more freedom in terms of where you may take your upper division electives. Specifically, you may choose any upper division, 5 unit course to satisfy your elective requirements. The rub lies in how these contribute to your project and your growth as a technology activist and/or technology linked social change advocate after graduation.

Consider this an exercise in understanding your own intellectual development. How have your classes shaped you? How did they make you more effective in your project? How did they prepare you to go on and do social good after graduation while maintaining tech savvy-ness and confidence? Contact the Tech Director if you’d like some help in fleshing out your justifications.

Course List

We’ve compiled a list of classes (that is by no means exhaustive) to help give you an idea of courses that might fit well with the plan you’re building for yourself. This list represents an ongoing conversation between you and Chris, so please shoot an email if you have questions about what’s on here or want to add something.

Sample Justification

Below is what Thomas used for his justifications. Thomas’s project was the 2012 implementation of the Youth Empowerment Institute. A project that brought students from Watsonville up to campus for a week of college access workshops and mobile apps labs.

  • SOCY 188G – Global Political Islam My work may bring me in contact with individuals from Islamic nations. As such it is important to understand the underpinnings of International relations regarding muslims, islamists, and moderates so that I may communicate effectively.
  • SOCY 169 – Social Inequality Needed to understand the processes behind wealth and dis/advantage dis/accumulation so that I may intervene effectively.
  • SOCY 194-11 – Mobile Apps for Change My practicum may incorporate a mobile feature. Also mobile apps are the emergent technology of social enterprise and as such it behooves me to familiarize myself with it.
  • SOCY 194-11 – civiCRM for Non-Profits Learning a Constituent Relationship Management system will aid me in making more useful relations with partners in my practicum. Also it will be useful when working with any NPO in the future.
  • SOCY 177 – Urban Sociology When working in cities or doing projects in cities, I need to understand the cultural dynamics that shape it and how cities are used and lived in.
  • SOCY 172 – Social Movements (Fall 12) Part of my job as a social entrepreneur is to understand how to motivate people to action and how movements behave.

Submitting Your Electives Justifications

Your elective justifications are not part of your practicum. They should be submitted in the quarter during which you plan to graduate. Please type up your electives along with your reasoning as to why they fit the GISES major, i.e. contribute to your project and your growth as a technology activist and/or technology linked social change advocate after graduation.

Please follow this link to the Electives Submission Form

Examples

Please go to everettprogram.org/products/practicums to view examples of project practicums.

Note: Requirements of the project practicum have changed in some significant ways recently. Prior to the 2015-2016 school year, there was very little in the way of structure for the project practicum. Consequently, practicums from before that period vary in terms of the way they are written and structured.

Submit Your Practicum

Once you’ve created your zip file, email it to Chris Benner at cbenner@ucsc.edu

Electives Justifications

Your elective justification sheet is not part of your practicum. However, if this is your final quarter and intend to graduate, please consult the Electives Justification section.